Here’s a deeper look at the artists/designers who’s work I featured in the Homothletix spread, including Ash Fist City, Sky Jordan King, and Sarah Rosenblatt (Zombie Basil Press). Thanks so much to each of them for their talent and allowing me access to their brilliance.


Ash Fist City

What is the focus of your work?

Fist City is a response to the world around me… THE OUTRAGE – like the fact that 2016 is considered the deadliest year for transgender [people]. As a non-binary gender identifying person, this is my family being slaughtered. It is the unstable and unnecessary beds of old energy remaining that we must shine the light on. Our time has come. The “bad” parts— the ‘no’s, the bullying, the ‘ur a freak’, the ‘ur not good enough’— [can be] absorbed and transformed into your own fuel. You burn off of that. It becomes your power. That is what Fist City is all about.

What is the focus of your work?

Fist City is a response to the world around me… THE OUTRAGE – like the fact that 2016 is considered the deadliest year for transgender [people]. As a non-binary gender identifying person, this is my family being slaughtered. It is the unstable and unnecessary beds of old energy remaining that we must shine the light on. Our time has come. The “bad” parts— the ‘no’s, the bullying, the ‘ur a freak’, the ‘ur not good enough’— [can be] absorbed and transformed into your own fuel. You burn off of that. It becomes your power. That is what Fist City is all about.

What inspired you to design/create fashion?

Fist City is an ode to the Loretta Lynn song of the same name. Fist City is a place we go to work it out. It’s about being confrontational. Standing up for what you know is right. Its about having a creed…It’s the fight inside to always be yourself. My creations come charged…whether its breaking gender norms, or a gentle reminder of retaliation to [the] violence against homos, or the gathering of light workers to be a part of the S.O.B. (SOULS ON BOARD) collaboration that provided services of the esoteric arts. Fist City [has] the achieved elevation of mind where one becomes unstoppable. Fist City isn’t about violence. It’s a state of mind. It’s the power in you. And the designs coming out of that [balanced with] my obsession for Sam “Ace” Rothstein’s wardrobe.

What’s the garment/project you’re most proud of?

Fist City is more that just a clothing line. We create family, a feeling that you are a part of something—understood. We throw dance parties to showcase local talent and sponsor talented street dancers as well as tattoo artists in So CAL. We are a street-smart brand [that is lifted up] by the “power to the people”. Raising money and awareness for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and the other water protectors at our night called PVSSY FLXXX. [It] has been the fist city formula of promoting/ integrating social activism. We see the world around and acknowledge that change is crucial. The injustices must crumble. We know we have the power. It is just about putting out the call for all of us to unite. And burn this bitch down… It’s the link that makes all this work for me.

What are some upcoming projects/ ideas/garments you are working on?

Fist City’s TOTAL DOMINATION dominatrix track suits

Other comments on your aesthetic or brand?

“Fuck peace & the police” -Tupac Shakur

Sky Jordan King

How would you describe your personal style?

Comfortable Luxury-ish How long have you been creating/designing? I’ve pretty much always had some critique or something I would change about the clothing I had been selling in my…retail life, but actual start-to-finish design didn’t start until I started school at SCC in 2014.

What’s the garment/project you’re most proud of?

My bomber jacket with the eight-sided star on the back. Everyone thought I was nuts for actually patterning that into the back piece and not just applying it on later. It was the first project I completed where I was like I can do this.

What are some upcoming projects/ideas/garments you are working on?

I just graduated from an extremely grueling two year fashion program, and I am still sort of recovering from the whole experience (it was great, but whoa!), which has included a lot of distance from my field of interest, so, I guess my long-term goal would be to someday open up my own shop filled with great pieces that anybody could enjoy.

Any other comments/notes on your aesthetic or brand?

You can take a look at my portfolio at skyjordanking.net

Sarah Rosenblatt / Zombie Basil Press

How would you describe your personal style?

It may sound like a joke, but some of my friends tell me I look like a trendy baby. Because I love mismatched patterns, color blocking, and wearing onesies.

What is the focus of your designs/brand?

Because I don’t have much experience in clothing construction, I’m mostly trying to develop my skills in portraying messages and playing with designs. As I learn more about apparel design, I’m excited about experimenting with queer and political text and imagery.

How long have you been creating/designing?

Only a couple of months!

What inspired you to design/create fashion?

Frankly, I am still pretty shy to calling myself a creator of fashion. I’m a comic artist and illustrator, and started playing with apparel design as another outlet for that. Actually, I had never even considered designing clothing until I created a piece entitled, “Ingredients of a Well-Balanced System of Body Hatred,” a comic about the intersections of racism, class inequality, misogyny, and fatphobia. A friend of mine asked if it were possible to get the piece printed on a body suit for them to wear, and once I started looking into those possibilities, I became intrigued by this idea. Because our bodies and the way they are seen is always political, it is interesting to me to think about using bodies as a medium for showing art.

What are some upcoming projects/ideas/garments you are working on?

I’ve been learning how to screen print over the past couple of months, which has been very exciting. My next project is a pretty a simple T-shirt with a floral pattern that says “NOT EXOTIC.” I wanted to make something personal, and as a mixed-race woman, feeling exotified has been a huge part of my experience of white supremacy, and this project has been healing in unlearning that. In terms of marketing the piece, I will specify that it is intended to be worn by people who have non-white ancestry. For this piece I was very inspired by the work of the Nalgona Positivity Project, a Xicana, Indigenous, and body-positive art and organizing group in LA, who make designs that are specifically to be worn by Indigenous people. I love the idea of putting intentionality into not only the aesthetic and design, but also the marketing and the distribution of a piece, especially when the fashion industry notoriously erases and misrepresents so many bodies and identities.

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